Carbonnade – Beef, Bacon, Beer & Onions

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Beef Carbonnade

Beef Carbonnade

Copyright by Jacqueline Peppard, all rights reserved.

A country Flemish woman deftly moves about her 17th century kitchen with hair tied up in a white woolen cap and blue muslin apron on. Braids of garlic, onions, and herbs are suspended from the rough hewn ceiling beams. Rays of late morning sun gently stream through a window and bounce against the white plaster walls, filling her eyes with golden reflections. Life is good this year. It is winter, but the bountiful summer harvest lines the cellar shelves with ceramic bottles of dark brown ale, sides of smoked pork, and baskets of root vegetables. She creates a stew for the mid-day meal, a recipe containing beef, bacon, onions, beer, dried herbs, and root vegetables – Beef Carbonnade. A savory aroma soon wafts throughout the house warming the heart and beckoning one to the table.

Spring is almost here, but most can’t even begin a garden of hardy greens yet. In countries still receiving snow, a Paleolithic hunter and gatherer’s food supply would be restricted to whatever wild game he could kill. Much of the ground would still be frozen, and any plant food like greens and root vegetables just wouldn’t be on the menu yet. A denizen of the 17th century would be running low on veggies and would be limited to properly stored root and tuber vegetables that mice or rats hadn’t raided. Any wild game would be stretched with pork raised and cured from the prior summer. Our early ancestors available winter food supplies gave birth to the dish also known as Carbonnade Flamande.

The gourmet name disguises the humble nature of the dish, a sweet-sour beef stew largely comprised of onions. Unlike Beef Bourguignon made with wine, it is distinguished by the rich earthy flavor of dark ale contrasted against onions and herbs. My interpretation calls for 4 different members of the allium family, each adding its own individual flavor to the mix, balsamic instead of apple cider vinegar, and LOTS of bacon. Root vegetables are typically boiled and served on the side. Continue reading

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Berry Delicious Jam

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Berry Jam

Berry Jam

Copyright by Jacqueline Peppard, all rights reserved.

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Traditional recipes require LOTS of sugar with fruit to sugar ratios ranging from 5:3 to 1:1. Just love jam, but hate the hefty price tag that goes along with the sugarless all fruit jams? Man, $5 for a teeny tiny jar LOADED with sugar! On top of that, the natural fruit flavor is diluted with grape juice concentrate and many “organic” brands contain additives, such as thickeners, preservatives, or artificial sweeteners, many of which aren’t labeled as organic, so they are definitely processed from genetically modified grains like corn.

The label reading nerd I am, I noticed that a jam marked “organic” had non-organic dextrose, citric acid, and pectin. The fruit and sugar were organic, but nothing else on the label – plus organic sugar was the number one ingredient, there was more sugar than fruit in the spread. Continue reading

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Holiday Giveaway – Spiralizer

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Giveaway4

December 19, 2015 Giveaway! Congratulations to John Clark, winner of the best Spiralizer on the market!

Make your own low carb, paleo, and gluten-free veggie pasta or chips with the best and sturdiest tool on the market. I love my Spiralizer, and I don’t miss pasta at all. It is easy to use and simple to clean. You can also view/purchase this on the following link Spiralizer Purchase Here.

Upcoming will be more giveaways, exclusive recipes, and more. Don’t miss out and Subscribe here. Welcome to the New Era Healthyeating community!

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Holiday Gift Idea – Cranberry Orange Sauce

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Holiday Cranberry Sauce

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Copyright 2015 by Jacqueline Peppard, all rights reserved.

Cranberries make a great winter sauce for meats and cheeses. Heated and served over warm Brie, oh yum! Mix with other fruits and reduce the sugar content by 75%. Fuji’s, McIntosh, and Gala are the apples to choose for obtaining the most sweetness. If you are lucky enough to have access to ripe sweet Fuyu persimmons, all the better, I use apples and persimmons interchangeably with this sauce. Oranges or mandarins also help out with sweetness plus add great flavor to the sour cranberries. Make up a batch for Thanksgiving and freeze/can the rest for Christmas or to use throughout winter. If you have a big enough pot, double or triple the recipe and can for Christmas gifts. Canning instructions provided at the end. Continue reading

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